EXHIBITION FROM JUNE 10TH TILL JULY 22ND, 2017

Kurar grew up in a furiously fast-changing world.
A natural inspiration for a work that takes a kind yet critical look at the failings of a society advancing too fast perhaps, or one dominated by increasingly strained social and political tensions.
Our daily life is rich. The stream of ever faster images, ever more intense events that have become part of everyday life and a globalization that now appears irreversible in every sense. A source of observation that Kurar dissects in meticulous work that evolves in parallel with our everyday existence.
It is because we have to know where we come from, in order to understand the present and guide our future, that Kurar’s aesthetics use the gentleness of images of a childhood at the start of the last century. This gentleness provides a powerful contrast to the crude images of a present social reality that would have been unimaginable 100 years ago.
Although the start of the 20th century was to change the world, its children could still preserve a certain innocence and freedom, and believe in their dreams for a better future.
Is it because our generation is subdued by the injustices we can no longer put right, or is it because the media force on us a narrower vision of a better future that Kumar felt the need to create Humanity?
Be that as it may, Humanity brings us contrasts that mirror freedoms given or taken away and the price(s) of life in a world that has implacably stamped its pace on us.
Kurar leaves us a clear field.
A field where we can reclaim our critical faculty, to understand what we were and to what we belong. He proposes that we reflect on where our society is heading, through images that are there not just to shake us up, but to make us understand that our freedom to dream exists, and from those dreams we can once again change our world.
The world of a century ago is no more. What world will it be in a hundred years?

“Humanity” is a direction, it is up to us to make it a path.

Cédric Godin